A parent’s story

Are British laws made for people with money?

 

Government law states that the new minimum wage is £6.31

Government law states that a working week should not be more than 48 hours.

United Kingdom Border Agency (UKBA) requirements for a British subject to bring their spouse into the UK are that they must be earning £18,600 a year.

Now £6.31 multiplied by 48 equals £302.88

£302.88 multiplied by 52 weeks equals £15,749.76

 

Therefore if someone was to earn the Government minimum wage even if they were able to work 48 hours per week for 52 weeks, they would still not be able to reach the UKBA requirements. (Note 52 weeks means no sick leave for casual workers no public holidays and no leave unless it’s paid leave)

 

It is the UKBA that allows students to enter the UK and although they cannot stop them from falling in love, young people seem to do this.

 

Such is the case for my son and his partner who are married.

 

A British student who leaves University in today’s economic climate finds it hard to get work so they end up being waiters or packers and therefore end up on the minimum wage and more often than not do not get to work 48 hours a week. If they are lucky they get 30 to 35 hours. Their foreign partner is not allowed to work more than 20 hours a week. So if the British subject is lucky enough to get 30 hours and the foreign partner gets 20 hours giving a total of 50 hours between them, this is still not enough. ((50×6.31) x52=£16,406)

 

The British student’s parents are prepared to house the couple and feed them but this is not taken into account by the UKBA.

In the case of these two students the foreign student’s parents are residing in the UK with right to remain but their support is not taken into account as well.

 

I would suggest that the UKBA stop all foreigners from coming into the UK as that is what they seem to want.

 

Regards

A very unhappy parent.

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Lucie’s story

I am a British woman, and have been living in Thailand for about 17
years. 14 years ago, I met my husband, Atsadang, who is Thai. A few
years later we married, and we have 2 children, a son aged 9 and a
daughter aged almost 6.

I have worked for the last 10 years as a primary school ESL teacher.
But, due to new rules saying that all foreign teachers must have a
degree in order to get a work permit, as of next year I won’t any
longer be able to work at the only job that foreigners are allowed to
do here.

Added to this is the fact that I don’t have a lot of faith in the Thai
education system, and don’t want my children to go through it. And
then there’s the simple fact that I have had enough of living here. I
want to go home.

I am earning the equivalent of 8,500 pounds a year, and we live very
well on that, as the cost of living in Thailand is low. I can even
save some for our airfares back to the UK. Where I live, jobs simply
don’t exist that pay 18,600 – or even 13,000. And then there’s the
fact that I would also have to have a job offer in the UK before
arriving. Jobs like that aren’t doled out over Skype, you know.

So I am faced with the strong possibility of having to take my
children back to the UK, and leave my husband here on his own, until
such time as I can get a well-paid job and present 6 months of
payslips. How do you think that makes my children feel? And my
husband, who will be alone for months (or years) on end.

I am in a similar position to many other people – my parents own a
large enough house, and are happy to let us stay for as long as we
need to. I also am quite happy to forego any rights to unemployment
benefits when I arrive. I would rather live with my parents, and
survive on 2 low wages, than tear apart my very close family and claim
benefits while chasing after a well-paid job.

PLEASE, keep the rules that check if it’s a genuine relationship, but
remove the financial requirement. People in many parts of the world
simply cannot make that kind of money.

Lucie